Monthly Archives: April 2013

GSoC and R: Off to the Races

Google Summer of Code has now opened for student applications, and the R Project has once again been selected as a mentoring organization.  I’ve discussed before that a variety of mentors have proposed a number of projects for students to work on during this summer, but I wanted to emphasize some points about the schedule.

The deadline for student submissions is May 03 at 19:00 UTC.  You have to have a credible application in Melange by this time, or the application will not get a slot.  That’s not a lot of time to create or pick an idea, write an applicationGSOC2013, identify a mentor, sign up for a Melange account, and post your application.  But students can improve their applications once they are posted, so it is worth putting up an incomplete draft if you need to.

Even after the deadline, students will receive questions and advice for improvements from the mentors once the application is up, and should be responsive to those requests.  All of the mentors are involved in voting about which projects will be funded.

Google has extended the amount of time spent determining slots this year, so the ‘behind-the-scenes’ process will be longer this year than it was in past years.  Accept/reject notices to students will come on May 31st.

Everyone who wants to participate in this year’s Google Summer of Code with R should join the Google Group: gsoc-r@googlegroups.com.

Good luck!

GSoC 2013: At the starting line

Google Summer of Code will be open for students on Monday, April 22.  The R Project has once again been selected as a mentoring organization , and a variety of mentors have proposed a number of projects for students to work on during this summer.  Here’s a bit about the program, and more on the R-related projects that are lining up for students this summer.GSOC2013

About Google Summer of Code

The concept is relatively simple – Google brings together students with mentors to work on open-source projects of their choosing.  Mentors get code written for their project, but no money; students get paid $5,000, equivalent to a nice summer internship.

If you’re a student and you’re interested on something R-related, pick something you’re interested in working on (whether a mentor has submitted an interesting idea you want to pursue, or if you have an idea and want a mentor).  With an idea in hand, submit a project application directly to Google.   Google will award a certain number of student slots to the R project, and projects will be ranked and slots allocated by the GSOC-R administrators and mentors.

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